Building Costs Per Square Foot in the State of Illinois, USA

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Building Costs Per Square Foot in the State of Illinois, USA

  • Residential Construction Market Analysis in the State of Illinois

  • Building Costs Per Square Foot in the State of Illinois for Luxury, Semi-Luxury, Best Standard, Good Standard, Average Standard and Minimum Standard Homes Single Family Homes

  • List of 23 Metropolitan Areas/Cities in Illinois – Percentage Deviation of the City/Town Building Cost from the National Average ($X), in Descending Order:

  • Cheapest and Most Expensive Places To Build in Illinois.

 

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New Home, Built and Completed in 2022 with 4 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms, Gross Floor 1,610 sqft, Lot Size 0.32 acres  on Street No 100 Olivia Dr, Marion, Illinois, USA – Price $225,000 Enquire About this House

Building costs are 4% higher than the national average in the state of Illinois and equivalent to the state of North Dakota, more expensive than 38 states in the USA. Residential Construction in Illinois is divided into two major phases:

  • New Single-Family Housing Construction
  • Rehabilitation Construction.

The total number of housing units built annually in the State can also be broken down by Ownership Type (renter vs. owner) and Tenure (Owner Occupied vs. Renter Occupied).

Information on the number of new single-family housing units built in Illinois is provided by the U.S. Census Bureau, and information on the number of existing residential units undergoing rehabilitation is compiled by Mortgage Bankers Association (MBA).

The $1.4 million project will run through the summer, and includes rebuilding the I-55 Bridge over Illinois Route 50.

The new design will allow for 1 mph up to 45 mph which is expected to reduce traffic congestion on IL 50 during peak travel times according to IDOT Public Affairs Specialist Paris Ervin.

The $7.2 million Illinois 53 project will include a new lane from I-80 to IL Route 38. Motorists must expect lane closures and some delays during the construction period that is expected to span until October of this year.

The center section of Illinois 20 in Champaign was closed Friday for reconstruction by the Illinois Department of Transportation, which is part of a $7 million project that will also close the southbound lanes from Springfield Avenue to University Avenue from January 15th to December 3rd.

In East St. Louis, a $32 million project on I-55 at the 10 mile marker will cause major traffic congestion for motorists who use this stretch of interstate.

A new 2.3 mile section of expressway with entry ramps and exit ramps is part of the project which will expand I-55 to six lanes.

The East St. Louis interchange reconstruction, including the addition of a new road, is part of $3 billion in interstate projects planned by IDOT for this year.

The $2 million US Route 45 pavement rehabilitation project in Pulaski County is a two-step project. The first is a resurfacing from IL Route 97 to the Middle Fork County Club Road, and from County Club Rd to US 45 south of Nashville in Montgomery County.

The second phase will include reconstruction on US 45 from the Middle Fork County Club Road to the 10 mile marker near Potosi in Washington county which is expected to begin in late summer.

The $1.2 million project to reconstruct and improve the intersection of IL Route 3 and Chapel Hill Road in Belleville includes removing and replacing the Chapel Hill Road Bridge over I-64.

Motorists can expect delays during construction which is expected to be completed by November 11th. In Champaign, a new surface will be applied to the US 45 highway from the I-57 overpass toward Royal.

The project is more than halfway completed, with completion by the end of April expected according to IDOT Spokesperson Paris Ervin.

A new layer will be applied to East St Louis Interstate 55 for between the North Grand Avenue exit and the Broadway mile marker.

Motorists can expect delays during construction which is expected to be completed by November 11th. In Mt Pulaski, a $5 million project will improve 4 miles of IL 105 from the Logan County line north to Warrensburg/Ava Road according to IDOT Spokesperson Paris Ervin.

The work includes drainage improvements and resurfacing. In Springfield, IDOT is working on a $1.5 million resurfacing project for I-55 from the US 45 interchange to the Woodside Avenue exit, including lane closures and ramp restrictions until January of next year.

The $54 million reconstruction of Interstate 70 in St Louis will require motorists to take alternate routes through July 2021 according to IDOT Spokesperson Paris Ervin.

The project will include resurfacing, replacement of seven bridges and repairs to slopes along the interstate.

In Illinois, nearly 90 percent of roads are in poor or mediocre condition according to a national transportation research group report from 2021.

In East St Louis, I-64 is being reconstructed at the 10 mile marker which requires motorists to take an alternate route until November of this year.

IDOT is expecting over 170 bridge construction projects to begin in the next few months with the goal to improve more than 1,650 nearly 7,000 bridges by 2020 according to IDOT Spokesperson Paris Ervin.

The $3 billion plan includes resurfacing for 400 miles of roadway and reconstruction of over 150 miles of roadway.

Illinois Construction Market

Construction is in a state of decline here in the Midwestern United States, but that is not the case when it comes to Illinois.

According to the Associated General Contractors of America (AGCA), construction spending increased in Illinois in 2012 by 3 percent, which was more than any other state outside of Texas. Overall, construction spending also grew in 32 states and Washington, DC.

During that same time, Illinois’ nonresidential construction market grew by 4 percent to $17.4 billion. This growth was seen in spending on all types of nonresidential projects with the exception of power plant construction, which declined 39 percent due to less work being done at coal-fired power plants.

The rise in other sectors was primarily due to a continued increase in spending on educational facilities, which was primarily from the recent passage of the state’s capital bill.

In addition, Illinois’ infrastructure market grew by 21 percent at $3.5 billion. This growth was primarily seen in transportation projects as well as water and sewer construction projects. The growth can also be attributed to private companies’ increased spending on transportation projects.

Despite a decline in overall construction activity, Illinois is not the only state that saw a growth in their infrastructure market.

27 states had an increase in infrastructure construction with 16 of those states showing increases of 10 percent or more.

This was due to the fact that several big-ticket transportation projects were funded by bonds and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

The decline in infrastructure rates was mainly due to work on power plants, water treatment projects and mining; this decline is not expected to continue into 2013.

The construction of new power plants will be minimal next year with most of the new construction at existing coal-fired power plants that are increasing their capacity.

As for water treatment projects, they are expected to increase in 2013 because of the need to comply with new regulations. However, mining construction is not likely to rebound until gold prices start moving up again.

The past year has been a good one for Illinois’ construction industry and it looks as if things will only get better next year.

The 2013 construction forecast has been revised up and now shows an increase of 9 percent. This is mostly due to the fact that Illinois’ capital bill passed during the summer of 2013 and it authorized $31 billion for new construction projects.

Illinois Construction Index

One thriving industry in Illinois is construction. According to the Associated General Contractors of America, there were 4,734 firms in the state that employed more than 100 workers during 2010.

These companies had combined payrolls of $11 billion and revenue of $39 billion. Although it is projected that nonresidential building construction will decline nearly 10 percent in 2011, construction of institutional buildings (some of which are related to education) is expected to rise 4 percent over the next year.

Public works projects like road construction will likely decline, but privately funded building projects should increase.

Although jobs may decline or disappear entirely, many workers who change their careers into construction management find that they still enjoy the work.

Those with experience on one type of project may be able to apply their knowledge on another, and those who excel can eventually move into managerial roles.

This is just one industry that Illinois has to offer. While the unemployment rate in the state continues to climb, there are many careers available for people who are willing to work hard at them. And those who do work hard will likely find satisfaction in what they do.

In addition to construction, the state has a thriving agricultural industry as well as research facilities at universities and colleges. For those looking for jobs with steady incomes, there are plenty of opportunities in Illinois.

The state’s construction industry is expected to see the most activity in late fall and winter, according to a new survey.

The Associated Builders & Contractors released its 2021-2022 Illinois Construction Market Outlook earlier this month, which predicts moderate growth throughout the next year.

The national trade association expects construction spending in the Prairie State to reach $30.6 billion in 2022, up from $30.2 billion last year.

The construction industry has made progress since the depths of the recession, according to association officials, but the recovery remains sluggish.

“The nation’s economy continues to experience slow economic growth and low demand for new capital investment,” Robert Murray, vice president of economic affairs at ABC, said in the report.

“Construction’s role as a significant part of the U.S. economy signals that residential and nonresidential activity will remain lackluster at best over the near term.”

Illinois Construction Outlook

Illinois construction projects are constantly under development, constantly looking for new advancement and constantly keeping the economy rolling.

With all the construction work happening in Illinois, it’s no wonder that Illinois employment is at an all-time high

The state of Illinois has always been known for its great number of skilled workers that can get any job done properly both in Illinois and elsewhere in the Midwest.

With the sheer number of construction projects currently in development, it’s no wonder so many people are looking to become skilled workers in Illinois or even running their own business.

Being a skilled worker is always beneficial; however, starting your own business can bring about great wealth.

The following list outlines major current construction projects happening in Illinois. These are great areas of opportunity for both skilled workers and for those thinking about starting their own business.

  • I-55 South Expansion – The expansion to I-55 is going to bring a lot of opportunities for Illinois construction projects. A number of interchanges will be reconstructed along with the widening and repaving of an already existing road. The expansion will also bring about the construction of several new interchanges while increasing the number of lanes in certain sections.
  • I-355 Completion – With almost 80 percent of the 7.8 mile long road completed, this project is slated for completion by 2022. It’s a great opportunity for Illinois construction projects. While it was originally slated to be completed by 2019, it’s now expected to pave the way for economic development and business expansion.
  • I-57 Completion – With only one section remaining, this is a great chance for Illinois construction projects. Only 3.5 miles of road remain and almost all bridges and interchanges must be constructed. It’s also an opportunity for business to move in and help the economic development process. With a completion date of 2022, this project will provide many great opportunities for skilled workers and those thinking about starting their own business.
  • IL-53 Completion – In an attempt as part of the Illinois Jobs Now Program, this road will bring a lot of opportunity to Illinois construction projects. The completion date is 2014 with a projected daily travel of 30,000. This is an opportunity for skilled workers and for those thinking about starting their own business.
  • I-80 Completion – I-80 will be soon complete as part of the Illinois Jobs Now Program. It’s expected to bring lots of economic development opportunities to the state. The completion date is set for 2022 but there are lots of opportunities already available.
  • I-74 Completion – This easy access route to the Quad Cities will soon be completed with 6 interchanges and 2 additional lanes. It brings a lot of economic development opportunities with it, including new business that can take advantage of the new roads in Illinois. The completion date is set for 2022, but there are lots of opportunities available now.
  • I-290 Completion – This Illinois construction projects will bring new roads and interchanges to the area around O’Hare Airport. Businesses interested in moving into this area can take advantage of the new development opportunity that comes with it. It’s expected to be completed by 2016 with lots of construction jobs available now.
  • I-80 (DuPage County) Completion – This road will make access to and from O’Hare Airport much easier for thousands of commuters each day. The completion date is set for 2022, but there are still plenty of opportunities for skilled workers and those thinking about starting their own business.
  • I-55 Extension – This Illinois construction projects will provide a much needed southeast entrance into the city of Chicago. It’s expected to be completed by 2022 but offers lots of opportunities for skilled workers and those thinking about starting their own business now.
  • Interstate 57 Completion – Currently, this is one of the most congested interstates in Illinois. It brings many economic development opportunities with it including new business relocations which will be able to take advantage of the easier access they’ll have to Chicago and beyond. Completion is set for 20202but there are lots of opportunities now for skilled workers and those thinking about starting their own business.
  • I-39 Completion – This is an opportunity for Illinois construction projects. In particular, this route will provide a direct connection to the Quad Cities area from Milwaukee and other southern Wisconsin cities. It’s expected to be completed by 2022 but there are already opportunities available now for skilled workers and those thinking about starting their own business.
  • I-55 / IL-100 Completion – This Illinois construction projects will provide a new route from the city of Chicago to Peoria, IL. It’s expected to be completed by 2022 but offers lots of opportunities for skilled workers and those thinking about starting their own business now.
  • I-55 / US-67 Interchange – This Illinois construction projects is being built to help alleviate congestion along this major route and bring new economic development opportunities to the region. Completion is set for 2022, but there are already lots of opportunities available now for skilled workers and those thinking about starting their own business.
  • I-55 (Tazewell County) – This will be a lane addition to an existing interstate in Illinois. This is part of the Illinois Jobs Now Program and offers lots of opportunities for skilled workers and those thinking about starting their own business. Completion date set for 2022 but there are already some construction jobs available now.
  • I-90 (Lake County) – This will be a new lane addition to an existing interstate in Illinois. Its part of the Illinois Jobs Now Program and offers lots of opportunities for skilled workers and those thinking about starting their own business. Completion is set for 2022 but there are already lots of construction jobs available now.

Illinois Number of Building Permits Statistics

Illinois is a state in the Midwestern region of the United States. Illinois has both Great Lakes and Mississippi River on its eastern border.

It has Chicago, which is one of the largest cities in America with 2.7 million people. On its western edge there are many forest preserves where bison roam free.

  • Number of building permits: 314,800
  • Number of building permits in Illinois is 314,800.
  • Number of residential building permits: 54,000
  • Number of residential building permits in Illinois is 54,000.
  • Number of non-residential building permits: 260,800
  • Number of non-residential building permits in Illinois is 260,800.
  • Total number of units authorized by building permits in Illinois is 678,600.
  • Number of residential units authorized by building permits in Illinois is 534,000.
  • Number of non-residential units authorized by building permits in Illinois is 144,600.
  • Total number of units authorized by building permits in Illinois is 678,600.

The Illinois House Price Index is an aggregation of monthly statistics for single-family home sales, as well as condominium and cooperative sales in the state.

The house price index (HPI) measures relative changes in the prices paid for residential properties over time and by location.

This information has been used since 1993 to help policymakers and researchers understand patterns in single-family home sales, including the effects of changes in interest rates and housing affordability.

The Illinois Department of Economics and Cropsey Analytics, LLC produce this report on behalf of the Center for Municipal Finance at The Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.

All price indices are expressed as quarterly index values to facilitate comparison across months within each quarter. The Illinois HPI is a weighted average of indices for the following nine geographic regions:

  • Chicago Metropolitan Division (Cook, DuPage, Kane, Lake and Will counties).
  • Macon-Champaign Illinois New England City and Town Area (Ford County).
  • East Central Illinois Combined Statistical Area (Champaign and Vermilion counties).
  • Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana (OH-KY-IN) City and Town Combined Statistical Area (Clark, Dearborn, Floyd, Harrison, Ohio, Scott and Switzerland counties).
  • Northern Illinois City and Town Combined Statistical Area (Jo Daviess County).
  • Central Illinois IL Micropolitan Statistical Area (Macon County).
  • East Central Illinois IL Micropolitan Statistical Area (Piatt County).
  • Southern Illinois IL Micropolitan Statistical Area (Washington and Williamson counties).
  • West Central Illinois IL Micropolitan Statistical Area (McDonough County).

Illinois House Price Index

Each HPI is calculated from a monthly price index of single-family housing sales in its geographic region. The structure of the index is identical to the structure of the Federal Housing Finance Agency’s repeat sales indices.

The HPI is based on all residential transactions recorded in public records and involving a sale price. Sales that are excluded from the index include:

  • Sales by individuals or firms that buy and resell houses for profit-not all such activity, however, is included in the index.
  • The sale of unimproved land-that is, raw land that does not have an existing house or other structure.
  • Sales where the financing for purchase is contingent upon future events, such as the closing of a new job or marriage.
  • Formal sales between family members.
  • Sales by financial institutions for their own accounts, without the intention of reselling the property.

Sales are included in the index if they are known to have occurred within the past 12 months, even if the closing date of the sale is not reported or has not yet occurred.

The HPI tracks some transactions that are complete but might still be subject to further review by title companies and other participants in the real estate market.

Sales that did not close and were resubmitted for a future month are counted in the index of the month it is resubmitted, even if the original sale occurred in an earlier time period.

Adjustments are made to sales prices when they are known to have been affected by unusual circumstances, such as multiple offers or a buyer paying all cash. This is done to prevent those sales from having a distortive effect on the indices.

The HPI for each geographic area is an average of the monthly regional indices, weighted by residential transaction volume as reported in public records throughout the state during the previous quarter. Each index measures price changes over time and across different geographical areas.

The index for the Chicago MSA includes only the nine counties of Cook, DuPage, Kane, Lake, McHenry and Will.

The OH-KY-IN CMSA contains the 15 southernmost Illinois counties of Alexander, Bond, Boone, Brown, Calhoun, Clay, Clinton, Coles, Crawford, Edwards, Effingham, Fayette, Franklin, Gallatin, Hamilton, Hardin, Jackson, Jasper, Jefferson, Johnson, Lawrence, Madison.

The East Central Illinois Combined Statistical Area comprises a total of 17 counties: Champaign and Vermilion in Central Illinois plus Clark and Floyd in the south-central part of the state.

The Northern Illinois City and Town Combined Statistical Area consists of the following 16 counties: Boone, DeKalb, DuPage, Grundy, Kane, Kankakee, Kendall, Lake and Will in northern Illinois plus Jersey and Macoupin in southwestern Illinois.

Preliminary HPIs are calculated using only those records that have been received from county recorders’ offices by the cutoff dates.

Final HPIs are also compiled using data that have been received throughout the month. The final number is expected to be within 2 percent of the preliminary number.

Building Costs Per Square Foot for Single Family Homes in the State of Illinois, USA

The quality of a house is determined by the type of materials used and the architectural design. In the United States, the following types of private dwellings are found in the market:

Class 1 – Luxury homes

Class 2 – Semi-luxury homes

Class 3 – Best standard homes

Class 4 – Good standard homes

Class 5 – Average standard homes

Class 6 – Minimum standard homes

In residential/housing projects, the construction cost per square foot is inversely proportional to the contract sum of the project. That means the construction cost per square foot will increase as the project value decreases, and the square foot cost will decrease as the project value increases. How is this? Builders’ pricing habits have a bearing on the square foot cost, which also includes the contractor’s profit and overheads. In a small building project, contractors have to factor in the risk of under-pricing, loss, profit erosion and being stuck on break-even point. Thus, a higher profit margin is needed in this case to mitigate the risks. Larger projects with a huge contract sum are safe for contractors in terms of the amount of profit and cushion for risks. The building costs below were last updated in December 2020:

Class 1 – Luxury Single Family Homes

The building cost per square foot for luxury private homes in Illinois ranges from $358.69 per sqft to $549.85 per sqft, with the average being $423.30 per sqft. As the bar chart shows below, bigger homes with a large gross floor area have the lowest building costs per ft2, and smaller homes with a small gross floor area have the highest building costs per ft2. Medium-sized homes are somewhere in between. Generally, the building cost per square foot decreases as the size of the house gets bigger, and increases as the house gets smaller.

Class 1 Luxury Single Family Homes - State of Illinois Building Costs

Class 1 Luxury Single Family Homes – State of Illinois Building Costs

Class 2 – Semi Luxury Single Family Homes

The building cost per square foot for semi-luxury private homes in Illinois ranges from $217.99 per sqft to $334.15 per sqft, with the average being $257.26 per sqft. As the bar chart shows below, bigger homes with a large gross floor area have the lowest building costs per ft2, and smaller homes with a small gross floor area have the highest building costs per ft2. Medium-sized homes are somewhere in between. Generally, the building cost per square foot decreases as the size of the house gets bigger, and increases as the house gets smaller.

Class 2 Semi Luxury Single Family Homes - State of Illinois Building Costs

Class 2 Semi Luxury Single Family Homes – State of Illinois Building Costs

Class 3 – Best Standard Single Family Homes

The building cost per square foot for best-standard private homes in Illinois ranges from $140.92 per sqft to $214.04 per sqft, with the average being $164.99 per sqft. As the bar chart shows below, bigger homes with a large gross floor area have the lowest building costs per ft2, and smaller homes with a small gross floor area have the highest building costs per ft2. Medium-sized homes are somewhere in between. Generally, the building cost per square foot decreases as the size of the house gets bigger, and increases as the house gets smaller.

Class 3 Best Standard Single Family Homes - State of Illinois Building Costs

Class 3 Best Standard Single Family Homes – State of Illinois Building Costs

Class 4 – Good Standard Single Family Homes

The building cost per square foot for good-standard private homes in Illinois ranges from $102.85 per sqft to $157.72 per sqft, with the average being $121.38 per sqft. As the bar graph shows below, bigger homes with a large gross floor area have the lowest building costs per ft2, and smaller homes with a small gross floor area have the highest building costs per ft2. Medium-sized homes are somewhere in between. Generally, the building cost per square foot decreases as the size of the house gets bigger, and increases as the house gets smaller.

Class 4 Good Standard Single Family Homes - State of Illinois Building Costs

Class 4 Good Standard Single Family Homes – State of Illinois Building Costs

Class 5 – Average Standard Single Family Homes

The building cost per square foot for average-standard private homes in Illinois ranges from $83.48 per sqft to $127.85 per sqft, with the average being $98.44 per sqft. As the bar graph shows below, bigger homes with a large gross floor area have the lowest building costs per ft2, and smaller homes with a small gross floor area have the highest building costs per ft2. Medium-sized homes are somewhere in between. Generally, the building cost per square foot decreases as the size of the house gets bigger, and increases as the house gets smaller.

Class 5 Average Standard Single Family Homes - State of Illinois Building Costs

Class 5 Average Standard Single Family Homes – State of Illinois Building Costs

Class 6 – Minimum Standard Single Family Homes

The building cost per square foot for minimum-standard private homes in Illinois ranges from $65.84 per sqft to $100.92 per sqft, with the average being $77.67 per sqft. As the bar graph shows below, bigger homes with a large gross floor area have the lowest building costs per ft2, and smaller homes with a small gross floor area have the highest building costs per ft2. Medium-sized homes are somewhere in between. Generally, the building cost per square foot decreases as the size of the house gets bigger, and increases as the house gets smaller.

Class 6 Minimum Standard Single Family Homes - State of Illinois Building Costs

Class 6 Minimum Standard Single Family Homes – State of Illinois Building Costs

List of 23 Metropolitan Areas/Cities in Illinois – Percentage Deviation of the City/Town Building Cost from the National Average ($X), in Descending Order:

There are 1299 municipalities (cities, towns and villages) grouped into 102 counties in the state of Illinois. The bar chart below indicates that building costs vary in each metro city/town. The construction cost per square foot in each of these metropolitan cities varies from the state and national average by a certain percentage based on the location factor also known as the local modifier.

The building costs for single family homes in this post include all Bills of Quantities with the exception of HVAC installations. So the total costs include all construction trades, electrical installation, plumbing, built-in cupboards, plumbing fittings, local authority fees and permits, utility connections (water, gas, sewer etc), professional fees (architect, engineers etc.), contingency sum, contractor’s profit, attendance and overheads. The Location Factor represents the value of the local construction index, i.e. variation in the cost of labour, materials and supervision. In working out the building costs per square foot, the cost of land, existing infrastructure, land servicing, allowance for escalation, interest costs, parking and loose furniture are not included in the estimate. Ground conditions are assumed to be normal for estimating purposes, but for your own project, you have to factor in ground conditions, weather and climate because no two projects are the same.

The percentage deviation of building costs from the National Average for each metropolitan area in Illinois is shown below.

If $X is the Average National Building Cost in the USA, then it will cost the following to build a residential property in each metro city/town in Illinois:

Illinois  Average 4% (4% more than X)

  1. Arlington Heights 600 14%
  2. Aurora 605 14%
  3. Belleville 622 0%
  4. Bloomington 617 -1%
  5. Carbondale 629 -4%
  6. Carol Stream 601 14%
  7. Centralia 628 -3%
  8. Champaign 618 -2%
  9. Chicago 606-608 15%
  10. Decatur 623 -7%
  11. Galesburg 614 -4%
  12. Granite City 620 3%
  13. Green River 612 5%
  14. Joliet 604 13%
  15. Kankakee 609 -3%
  16. Lawrenceville 624 -6%
  17. Oak Park 603 18%
  18. Peoria 615-616 6%
  19. Peru 613 2%
  20. Quincy 602 16%
  21. Rockford 610-611 3%
  22. Springfield 625-627 0%
  23. Urbana 619 -4%

 

The Metropolitan Area List above as well as the Bar Graphs below shows that Decatur is the cheapest city to build a private home in the state of Illinois, and Oak Park is the most expensive city to build a home. Building costs are -7% below the national average in Decatur and 18% above the national average in Oak Park.

Deviation of City Building Costs from National Average - State of Illinois Ascending Order

Deviation of City Building Costs from National Average – State of Illinois Ascending Order

Deviation of City Building Costs from National Average - State of Illinois Aphabetical Order

Deviation of City Building Costs from National Average – State of Illinois Aphabetical Order

Cheapest Places To Build in Illinois:

Decatur is cheapest to place to build at -7% below the national average, followed by Lawrenceville at -6% below the national average. The third cheapest places to build a house are Carbondale, Galesburg and Urbana at -4% below the national average, followed by Centralia and Kankakee at -3% below the national average. The fifth cheapest place to build is Champaign at -2% below the national average, followed by Bloomington at -1% below the national average.  Building costs in Belleville and Springfield are equal to the national average. The eighth cheapest cities to build is Peru at 2% above the national average, followed by Granite City and Rockford at 3% more than the national average.

Expensive Places To Build in Illinois:

If anything between 5% and 10% is considered expensive, then there are two such metropolitan areas in the state of Illinois. Building a house in the city of Green River is 5% more than the national average. Building a home in Peoria is 6% above the national average.

More Expensive Places To Build in Illinois:

If anything between 10% and 15% is considered more expensive, then there are four such metropolitan areas in state of Illinois. Residential building costs are 13% above the national average in Joliet. The cities of Arlington Heights, Aurora and Carol Stream have the same building costs at 14% above the national average.

Very Expensive Places To Build in Illinois

The most expensive places to build a house in the USA are those 15% above the national average. There are 3 such places in Illinois. The city of Chicago is among the most expensive to build a house at 15% above the national average. Building costs are 16% higher than the national average in the city of Quincy and Oak Park takes the top spot at 18% above the national average.

Illinois State Average Costs:

Private home building costs in the state of Illinois are 4% higher than the national average. Building cost rates in the metropolitan areas of Granite City, Rockford and Green River are closer to the Illinois state average by a deviation of 1%. Oak Park is the most expensive city to build a home in Illinois, and the state of Illinois is number 39 on the national ascending costs scale.


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