Building Costs Per Square Foot in the State of Ohio, USA

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Building Costs Per Square Foot in the State of Ohio, USA

  • Residential Construction Market Analysis in the State of Ohio

  • Building Costs Per Square Foot in the State of Ohio for Luxury, Semi-Luxury, Best Standard, Good Standard, Average Standard and Minimum Standard Homes Single Family Homes

  • List of 17 Metropolitan Areas/Cities in Ohio – Percentage Deviation of the City/Town Building Cost from the National Average ($X), in Descending Order:

  • Cheapest and Most Expensive Places To Build in Ohio.

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Building costs in Ohio resemble the national average, lower than 10 states in the USA and equivalent to the states of Kansas, Washington and Wisconsin. During the pre-pandemic decade from 2009 to 2019, the state experienced a construction boom in the North Eastern region and city of Columbus. Jobs in this sector grew by 19% in the Northeast region and the combined average salary for all occupations in the construction industry was $74,258 per year. About 13,300 labourers, 8200 electricians and 7,300 carpenters were employed during the decade ending in 2019. The disruption caused by the Covid-19 pandemic in 2020 was expected to end in the last month of 2021, signalling the beginning of the recovery of the industry, projected to bounce back to pre-pandemic outputs and fully recovering in 2022. The sector is expected to grow by 10% in the period ending in 2025. Columbus is the state capital of Ohio, which also happens to be the biggest city in the region. The city registered $4 billion in new construction projects in the first 7 months of 2019, across various categories which include residential, commercial and infrastructure works. There was $2.6 billion worth of non-residential projects, $1.4 billion worth of residential projects, representing a 38% and 6% increase respectively from the previous year. Columbus has received an average annual value of $4.975 billion in projects from 2015 to 2018.

The high volume of projects in Ohio can be linked to the increase in population in Columbus which grew by 13.1% from 2010 to 2018 spurring construction activity in the city’s residential, commercial and infrastructural sectors. The affordable housing and rental rates have attracted business and jobs, with people moving in to settle in new homes built in the CBD and sparsely populated urban areas. The city has more than 300 projects in the planning, building and completed stages, some of which include the 1000+ room $220 million Hilton Hotel, $300 million football stadium, Scioto Peninsula $500 million mixed-use development with residential apartments, hotels, office and parking space. Yet another exciting mixed-used development is the ongoing Evans Farm project valued at $1.5 billion, featuring homes, offices, shops, restaurants, recreational parks and schools. Like many other regions in the USA, skilled labour is hard to come by and sourced outside the state to fill vacancies. Google, Facebook and Amazon are building in Columbus. Computer chip maker Intel Corp is planning to build a $20 billion semiconductor manufacturing plant in New Albany, Ohio, which could be the state’s biggest high value project in history, adding 3000 jobs into the state economy. The Ohio State University (OSU) is building a medical research centre (Waxner Tower) valued at $2 billion. Notable projects in smaller cities include the  600,000 ft2 Sherwin-Williams Research and Development Center in Brecksville valued at $600 million, the $2,3 billion Ultium Cells LLC Battery Plant in Lordstown occupying a gross floor area of 2.8 million square foot is nearing completion and expected to open in 2022, the $1.3 billion Combined Cycle Gas Turbine Plant (CCGT) in Columbiana County built by Bechtel Engineering and managed by Advanced Power has been completed. Workers at the Toledo Oil Refinery in Oregon, Ohio owned by BP-Husky were left facing uncertainty after the construction of the Enbridge Pipeline 5 in Michigan was halted by a state order issued by the Governor of Michigan in May 2021 citing environmental concerns.

Residential Construction Market Analysis in the State of Ohio

Ohio posted a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 3,700 home starts in April, down from 4,600 starts reported for March and 8,400 starts recorded in April 2009. Year-to-date construction is running ahead of projections, but the market may be tiring, said Bill Lafayette, owner of Economy.com LLC in Chagrin Falls.

The amount of housing units authorized for construction fell to 5,100 starts last month from March’s total of 5,500 and 8,600 at the same time last year. Housing production has slowed by nearly half this year, according to the Home Builders Association of Greater Cleveland.

By volume, new residential construction was flat in April compared to March, but down 16 percent from a year ago. Nonetheless, housing production is up 14 percent this year over last because January’s total was unusually low at 2,300 starts.

The U.S. Census Bureau releases an annual report on new residential construction activity in the United States that provides extensive data on the number of units, square footage, and value of new privately owned housing units authorized each year in Ohio by state, region, size of house (single-family vs. multifamily), type of foundation, building type, and building cost.

The Census Bureau also compiles similar data for each county in Ohio by zip code. The statistics include the number of new housing units authorized; number and percentage of single-family and multifamily units; and total and average square footage in thousands of feet for existing structures, dwellings under construction, and the total value of new housing units. The data is summarized by county and zip code, which allows for a regional analysis of construction activity throughout the state.

The Census Bureau began reporting on new residential construction in 1959. Ohio’s first-year total authorized was 1,591 units valued at $53 million. Since then the number of authorized housing units has grown consistently, reaching a total of 137,956 units in 2012 valued at $7.9 billion.

The Census Bureau data show that the majority of authorized housing units for new construction between 1959 and 2012 were single-family houses. In 2012 there were 8,111 single-family units worth $3.1 billion approved for construction compared to 7,745 multifamily units worth $4.8 billion.

The Midwestern region accounted for the largest percentage of housing units authorized statewide, although its share has declined over time.

In 1959, the Midwest’s total was 52 percent compared to 24 percent for both New England and South Atlantic regions combined.

The Midwest’s share has since dropped to just 14 percent in 2012 while both New England and South Atlantic regions’ shares grew to 18 percent and 16 percent, respectively.

The Cleveland-Elyria Metropolitan Area (which includes Cuyahoga, Geauga, Lake, Lorain, and Medina counties) has consistently accounted for the largest share of new residential construction statewide. Its share was as high as 88 percent in 1980, but has since declined to 43 percent of the 2012 total.

Other significant metropolitan areas that have experienced a steady increase in their shares of statewide new residential construction over time include Columbus (from 1 percent in 1959 to 18 percent in 2012), Cincinnati-Middletown (1 percent to 13 percent), and Akron (1 percent to 6 percent).

The other counties in Ohio have accounted for small shares of the statewide totals. In 2012, these counties’ represented about 8 percent of new residential construction statewide. Eleven counties had no housing units authorized for construction during the year while another 41 counties accounted for less than 2 percent each of that total.

Ohio Construction Outlook

According to the 2021 construction outlook survey for Ohio by the Associated General Contractors of America (AGC). On the overall, there was a negative outlook in the value of projects expected in 2021.

The Ohio construction market is expected to grow 7 percent annually in 2009 and 2010, according to two reports released this month.

One report, by the Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC) of Columbus for its annual statewide construction forecast conference Jan. 27-28 at the Hyatt Regency in Dublin, Ohio, said the rise in new construction starts will be driven by Ohio’s combined coal, natural gas and alternative energy sources.

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The other report is an analysis from six trade associations on the state of Ohio’s construction industry called “Construction Workforce 2000+,” which found that more than 92 percent of construction firms in Ohio are complying with local apprenticeship requirements.

Construction employment in the state is expected to grow 7 percent annually through 2014, according to the report.

“Construction already has been a bright spot in our economy,” Paul T. Gallagher, ABC’s vice president and chief executive officer (CEO), said in a statement released Jan. 28 for the forecast conference.

“This year will be no different as construction activity is expected to continue its steady rise. This will be driven by Ohio’s emerging alternative energy sources, which are only expected to increase over the next decade.”

Gallagher said that construction employment has grown more than 4 percent annually since 2003 and is expected to grow nearly 5 percent this year.

The report projects that another 2 percent growth through 2010 will bring Ohio’s construction employment to more than 631,000 in 2010.

Construction spending in the state is expected to grow 3 percent this year and another 5 percent through 2010, totaling $21 billion for the year, ABC said.

The report predicts that public sector construction will remain flat for 2009 but will grow significantly by 9 percent in both 2010 and 2011. The private sector is expected to grow 7 percent in 2009 but only 1 percent in 2010.

In addition, Ohio construction employment is expected to have a strong representation of veterans due to the fact that many military bases are located within the state’s borders, ABC said.

In fact, more than 59,000 vets work in the trade nationally and about 10 percent of that number work in Ohio.

“Ohio’s construction firms and the industry’s workforce are well positioned to benefit from growth in highway, bridge and other public works projects,” Gallagher said.

“We expect increased activity on these fronts to be complemented by a continued expansion of private sector investment.”

Gallagher also noted that the state recently has seen a surge in the construction of ethanol plants as well as wind turbines, which will contribute to overall growth.

“It is important that we remain vigilant in maintaining a positive relationship with our state and local elected officials,” Gallagher said.

“We must also ensure that our workforce has access to training opportunities so they can meet the high skill sets necessary to compete for this work.”

The second report, “Construction Workforce 2000+,” was conducted by Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC) of Ohio, Building and Construction Trades Council of Ohio (BCTC), Associated General Contractors of America-Columbus Chapter (AGC), National Electrical Contractors Association-Central States (NECA), Ohio Bricklayers and Allied Craft workers (OCAC), and United Association of Journeymen and Apprentices of the Plumbing & Pipe Fitting Industry of the U.S.A., Canada, Australia and New Zealand (UA).

The study found that 92 percent of construction companies in Ohio are complying with local apprenticeship requirements, ABC said. In addition, more than 1,000 new apprentice registrations or job orders were filed in 2008.

The report also found that Ohio construction apprenticeships will produce more than 8,500 graduates and nearly 69 percent of those workers will be employed as journeyman by the end of their training period. Nationally, construction employers expect to hire 927,000 new workers by 2014.

Construction employers expect to fill approximately half of these positions with people who will have less than two years of experience and more than 90 percent of them plan to hire someone with a high school diploma or the equivalent, ABC said.

Ohio Construction Index

Construction activity in Ohio picked up at a faster pace this month, as the AIA (American Institute of Architects) Ohio Construction Index (OCI) registered 49.2, its first expansionary reading since October 2015 and an 11-point improvement on last month’s reading. The index has registered below 50 for five out of the seven months of 2016.

“After four consecutive months of contraction, the OCI rose to 49.2 in March,” said AIA Ohio Executive Director Kent Smith.

“The majority of construction firms reported positive change on the business side since our last report, while some sentiment indicators have remained flat.”

The two most important issues facing construction firms remain finding and hiring more workers and the stability of general business conditions.

The most important project budgets have been reported as $1 million to $5 million for a third straight month, while residential building activity is at its lowest level since 2011.

The Sunshine State registered an index reading of 51.0 in March – five points lower than February’s reading – but still well above the neutral 50.0 mark, suggesting construction activity is expanding at a healthy rate.

Florida‘s 2016 OCI registered 51.0 in March, continuing to reflect strong growth for the state’s construction industry,” said AIA Florida Executive Director Pat DeMarco. “The majority of Sunshine State firms remain optimistic about future conditions.” The three most important issues facing construction firms are the stability of general business conditions, hiring more workers and finding more work, while access to project financing is less of a concern. The majority (71%) of projects underway in Florida are valued at $1 million to $5 million.

Construction activity in California continued its steady pace in March with the CAI (California Architects‘ Index) registering at 54.7, a four-point increase from February’s reading and its highest point since June 2015. The index has registered above 50 for all but one month over the past two years.

“The CAI registered 54.7 in March as California‘s construction industry bounced back from a brief slowdown,” said AIA California Executive Director David Thorne. “The majority of architects report that business conditions continue to expand, and expect activity to improve in the months ahead.”

The three most important issues facing construction firms are the stability of general business conditions, finding more work and hiring more workers; while access to project financing is less of a concern. A plurality (42%) of projects underway in California are valued at $5 million or more.

AIA Indiana‘s construction index registered a healthy 54.3 in March, marking the fourth consecutive month it has been above 50.0 and its highest mark since July 2015, as firms report that business conditions continue to expand and hiring activity remains strong.

“The AIA Indiana Construction Index (ACI) registered 54.3 in March, which is the strongest reading in over a year,” said AIA Indiana Executive Director Joe Woodward. “This month’s report shows that business conditions continue to improve and hiring activity remains strong.” The three most important issues facing construction firms are finding more work, hiring more workers and keeping up with project demand.

The majority (53%) of projects underway are valued at $1 million to $5 million, while the number of active design firms is up slightly from last month’s report.

The AIA Connecticut Construction Index registered 51.3 in March, four points higher than February’s reading and its highest level since August 2015. Firms report that business conditions are at their strongest levels in nearly two years, while hiring activity is steady.

“The AIA Connecticut Construction Index (ACCI) registered 51.3 in March, continuing to show strong growth for the state’s construction industry,” said AIA Connecticut Executive Director John Kleinschmidt. “Construction firms have begun 2017 with increased optimism, largely due to a relatively strong regional economy.” The three most important issues facing construction firms are the stability of general business conditions, hiring more workers and finding more work. The majority (51%) of projects underway are valued at $1 million to $5 million.

The AIA Kansas City Metro Area Index registered 51.2 in March, seven points higher than the previous month’s reading.

“The AIA Kansas City Metro Area Index increased in March to 51.2, its highest point since November 2015,” said AIA Kansas City Metro President Don Wulfhorst. “For all practical purposes, the construction market in our region is at pre-recession levels.” The three most important issues facing construction firms are the stability of general business conditions, finding more work and hiring more workers; while access to project financing remains a top concern. The majority (65%) of projects underway in Kansas City are valued at $1 million to $5 million.

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The AIA North Carolina (NCI) index registered 52.4 in March, up one point from February.

“The AIA North Carolina Index registered 52.4 in March as the state’s construction industry continued to expand,” said AIA North Carolina Executive Director Mollie Carmichael. “Economic indicators show that North Carolina‘s economy continues to improve.” The three most important issues facing construction firms are the stability of general business conditions, finding more work and hiring more workers; while access to project financing is less of a concern. A majority (54%) of projects underway in North Carolina are valued at $1 million to $5 million.

The AIA Phoenix Metro Index registered 51.2 in March, eight points higher than February’s reading and the highest level since August 2016.

“The AIA Phoenix Metro Index increased in March to 51.2, its highest reading since last summer,” said AIA Phoenix Metro President Paul Summerville. “We continue to see improvement in the residential sector which is offsetting declines in the public and commercial sectors.” The three most important issues facing construction firms are stability of general business conditions, finding more work and hiring more workers. The majority (63%) of projects underway in Phoenix are valued at $1 million to $5 million.

The AIA Seattle Metro Index registered 55.6 in March, the highest reading since July 2016 and three points higher than February’s reading.

“Seattle’s construction industry has experienced a dramatic turnaround in the past year,” said AIA Seattle Metro President John Shaw. “What’s more, firms are optimistic about the next six months because of increased optimism about project activity and revenue.” The three most important issues facing construction firms are stability of general business conditions, finding more work and hiring more workers; while access to project financing is less of a concern. A majority (55%) of projects underway in Seattle are valued at $1 million to $5 million.

Ohio Average House Price

House prices in Ohio are increasing. The average list price of a home recently hit $157,000.

The average house price for Ohio based on the last 12 months of data is about $128,000 (November 2014), which is a drop of 1% from November 2013.

The median list price for Ohio is only about $104,000, showing that there are many areas available with lower prices than the state average.

Ohio home values have already been impacted from the national trend of falling values, but they have held up much better than other areas in the country.

In fact Ohio’s real estate market has been very stable with a few decreases here and there since January 2012 when home values started to drop. Although prices have decreased in Ohio for over 3 years, they are still higher than values were around 2011.

Ohio has been affected by some of the same economic problems as other states, including significant unemployment numbers and foreclosures during the recession.

However Ohio’s economy was not hit as hard as some other areas. Ohio still does have some major cities that were greatly impacted by the recession, which are causing home values to be low in those areas.

Cleveland and Toledo were both amongst the cities that experienced one of the biggest drops in home values since 2011.

In November 2014, Cleveland’s monthly median list price was about $84,000, which is a decrease of 1% from October 2014 and a drop of 8% from November 2013. On average homes for sale in this city sit on the market for only about 40 days, which is much shorter than the national average of about 100 days.

Cincinnati has also experienced a large drop in median list price during the past 3 years, with November 2014 prices at $128,000.

This value is a drop of 1% from October 2014 and 4% lower than November 2013. In Cincinnati homes sit on the market for about 70 days, which is a little longer than Cleveland but still much shorter than other cities in Ohio.

This year, the state’s median income is expected to rise 1%. This increase could affect Ohio house prices positively through 2014.

After experiencing negative house price growth last year due to the recession, Ohio is starting to see positive results. The current median for a house in the state is $157,000.

In 2013, the state’s median income is expected to rise 1 percent from 2012. This increase could affect Ohio house prices positively through 2014.

Get free property reports to see what your home is worth and how it has changed over time with our Market Analysis Reports. There you can also find neighborhood information to help you choose where to live in Ohio.

Ohio House Price Index

According to Home Builders Research Inc., Cincinnati and Columbus are among the ten best markets for construction activity in the country this year.

Industry professionals are expecting house prices in Ohio to increase another 2 percent this year.

Home prices may be rising, but the housing crisis is still having its effect on some homeowners. According to Core Logic, 15 percent of homes in Ohio had negative equity at the end of 2012. This means that they owe more on their mortgages than their houses are worth.

The Ohio House Price Index (HPI) is an attempt to address the lack of reliable, timely, and easily available house price information in Ohio.

The HPI provides monthly estimates of house prices by county for the years 1989 through 2014. Estimates are adjusted using a hedonic regression model that controls for both observed and unobserved differences among counties.

The Ohio House Price Index (HPI) is an attempt to address the lack of reliable, timely, and easily available house price information in Ohio. The HPI provides monthly estimates of house prices by county for the years 1989 through 2014. Estimates are adjusted using a hedonic regression model that controls for both observed and unobserved differences among counties.

Estimates are performed using a hedonic regression model that controls for both observed and unobserved differences among counties as well as other explanations such as age, size, amenities, etc.

Controlling for unobserved county characteristics is accomplished through the creation of housing-specific county fixed effects.

The base year of the index is 1989 and the index value in a given year represents the average house price relative to the base year. Values are reported in constant 2014 dollars.

The results of these procedures are presented in Table 1 which contains estimates of Ohio house prices by county for 1989, 1992, 1995, 1998, 2001, 2004, 2007 and 2010-2014.

To illustrate how these figures can be used to estimate changes in house prices between two points in time, consider the case of two counties that are adjacent to one another and contain similar types of housing.

Suppose that at the beginning of 1995, county A had an index value 50 percent greater than county B. By the end of 1998 the gap grew to 70 percent where it remained through 2014.

Using these values, the author estimates that between 1995 and 1998 house prices increased by 33 percent in county A but only 15 percent in county B.

To illustrate how the index can be used to measure appreciation over time for a single county, consider Franklin County which contains Columbus, Ohio’s capital city.

 

Building Costs Per Square Foot for Single Family Homes in the State of Ohio, USA

The quality of a house is determined by the type of materials used and the architectural design. In the United States, the following types of private dwellings are found in the market:

Class 1 – Luxury homes

Class 2 – Semi-luxury homes

Class 3 – Best standard homes

Class 4 – Good standard homes

Class 5 – Average standard homes

Class 6 – Minimum standard homes

In residential/housing projects, the construction cost per square foot is inversely proportional to the contract sum of the project. That means the construction cost per square foot will increase as the project value decreases, and the square foot cost will decrease as the project value increases. How is this? Builders’ pricing habits have a bearing on the square foot cost, which also includes the contractor’s profit and overheads. In a small building project, contractors have to factor in the risk of under-pricing, loss, profit erosion and being stuck on breakeven point. Thus, a higher profit margin is needed in this case to mitigate the risks. Larger projects with a huge contract sum are safe for contractors in terms of the amount of profit and cushion for risks. The building costs below were last updated in December 2020:

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Class 1 – Luxury Single Family Homes

The building cost per square foot for luxury private homes in Ohio ranges from $344.89 per sqft to $528.70 per sqft, with the average being $407.02 per sqft. As the bar chart shows below, bigger homes with a large gross floor area have the lowest building costs per ft2, and smaller homes with a small gross floor area have the highest building costs per ft2. Medium-sized homes are somewhere in between. Generally, the building cost per square foot decreases as the size of the house gets bigger, and increases as the house gets smaller.

Class 1 Luxury Single Family Homes - State of Ohio Building Costs

Class 1 Luxury Single Family Homes – State of Ohio Building Costs

Class 2 – Semi Luxury Single Family Homes

The building cost per square foot for semi-luxury private homes in Ohio ranges from $209.61 per sqft to $321.30 per sqft, with the average being $247.36 per sqft. As the bar chart shows below, bigger homes with a large gross floor area have the lowest building costs per ft2, and smaller homes with a small gross floor area have the highest building costs per ft2. Medium-sized homes are somewhere in between. Generally, the building cost per square foot decreases as the size of the house gets bigger, and increases as the house gets smaller.

Class 2 Semi Luxury Single Family Homes - State of Ohio Building Costs

Class 2 Semi Luxury Single Family Homes – State of Ohio Building Costs

Class 3 – Best Standard Single Family Homes

The building cost per square foot for best-standard private homes in Ohio ranges from $135.50 per sqft to $205.81 per sqft, with the average being $158.64 per sqft. As the bar chart shows below, bigger homes with a large gross floor area have the lowest building costs per ft2, and smaller homes with a small gross floor area have the highest building costs per ft2. Medium-sized homes are somewhere in between. Generally, the building cost per square foot decreases as the size of the house gets bigger, and increases as the house gets smaller.

Class 3 Semi Luxury Single Family Homes - State of Ohio Building Costs

Class 3 Semi Luxury Single Family Homes – State of Ohio Building Costs

Class 4 – Good Standard Single Family Homes

The building cost per square foot for good-standard private homes in Ohio ranges from $98.89 per sqft to $151.65 per sqft, with the average being $116.71 per sqft. As the bar graph shows below, bigger homes with a large gross floor area have the lowest building costs per ft2, and smaller homes with a small gross floor area have the highest building costs per ft2. Medium-sized homes are somewhere in between. Generally, the building cost per square foot decreases as the size of the house gets bigger, and increases as the house gets smaller.

Class 4 Semi Luxury Single Family Homes - State of Ohio Building Costs

Class 4 Semi Luxury Single Family Homes – State of Ohio Building Costs

Class 5 – Average Standard Single Family Homes

The building cost per square foot for average-standard private homes in Ohio ranges from $80.27 per sqft to $122.93 per sqft, with the average being $94.65 per sqft. As the bar graph shows below, bigger homes with a large gross floor area have the lowest building costs per ft2, and smaller homes with a small gross floor area have the highest building costs per ft2. Medium-sized homes are somewhere in between. Generally, the building cost per square foot decreases as the size of the house gets bigger, and increases as the house gets smaller.

Class 5 Semi Luxury Single Family Homes - State of Ohio Building Costs

Class 5 Semi Luxury Single Family Homes – State of Ohio Building Costs

Class 6 – Minimum Standard Single Family Homes

The building cost per square foot for minimum-standard private homes in Ohio ranges from $63.31 per sqft to $97.04 per sqft, with the average being $74.68 per sqft. As the bar graph shows below, bigger homes with a large gross floor area have the lowest building costs per ft2, and smaller homes with a small gross floor area have the highest building costs per ft2. Medium-sized homes are somewhere in between. Generally, the building cost per square foot decreases as the size of the house gets bigger, and increases as the house gets smaller.

Class 6 Semi Luxury Single Family Homes - State of Ohio Building Costs

Class 6 Semi Luxury Single Family Homes – State of Ohio Building Costs

List of 17 Metropolitan Areas/Cities in Ohio – Percentage Deviation of the City/Town Building Cost from the National Average ($X), in Descending Order:

There are 1204 municipalities grouped into 57 statistical areas and 88 counties in the state of Ohio. The bar chart below indicates that building costs vary in each metro city/town. The construction cost per square foot in each of these metropolitan cities varies from the state and national average by a certain percentage based on the location factor also known as the local modifier.

The building costs for single family homes in this post include all Bills of Quantities with the exception of HVAC installations. So the total costs include all construction trades, electrical installation, plumbing, built-in cupboards, plumbing fittings, local authority fees and permits, utility connections (water, gas, sewer etc), professional fees (architect, engineers etc.), contingency sum, contractor’s profit, attendance and overheads. The Location Factor represents the value of the local construction index, i.e. variation in the cost of labour, materials and supervision. In working out the building costs per square foot, the cost of land, existing infrastructure, land servicing, allowance for escalation, interest costs, parking and loose furniture are not included in the estimate. Ground conditions are assumed to be normal for estimating purposes, but for your own project, you have to factor in ground conditions, weather and climate because no two projects are the same.

The percentage deviation of building costs from the National Average for each metropolitan area in Ohio is shown below.

If $X is the Average National Building Cost in the USA, then it will cost the following to build a residential property in each metro city/town in Ohio:

Ohio Average 0% (0% more than X)

  1. Akron 442-443 1%
  2. Canton 446-447 -2%
  3. Chillicothe 456 -2%
  4. Cincinnati 450-452 3%
  5. Cleveland 440-441 3%
  6. Columbus 432 5%
  7. Dayton 453-455 1%
  8. Lima 458 -5%
  9. Marietta 457 -5%
  10. Marion 433 -6%
  11. Newark 430-431 3%
  12. Sandusky 448-449 -3%
  13. Steubenville 439 1%
  14. Toledo 434-436 7%
  15. Warren 444 -5%
  16. Youngstown 445 -3%
  17. Zanesville 437-438 -1%

The Metropolitan Area List above as well as the Bar Graphs below indicate that Marion is the cheapest city to build a private home in the state of Ohio, and Toledo is the most expensive city to build a home. Building costs are -6% below the national average in Marion and 7% above the national average in Toledo.

Deviation of City Building Costs from National Average - State of Ohio Ascending Order

Deviation of City Building Costs from National Average – State of Ohio Ascending Order

Deviation of City Building Costs from National Average - State of Ohio Aphabetical Order

Deviation of City Building Costs from National Average – State of Ohio Aphabetical Order

Cheapest Places To Build in Ohio:

Marion is cheapest to place to build at -6% below the national average, followed by Lima, Marietta and Warren at -5% below the national average. The third cheapest place to build a house is Sandusky and Youngstown at -3% below the national average, followed by Canton and Chillicothe at -2% below the national average. The fifth cheapest place to build is Akron, Dayton and Steubenville at 1% above the national average, followed by Cincinnati, Cleveland and Newark at 3% above the national average.

Expensive Places To Build in Ohio:

If anything between 5% and 10% is considered expensive, then there are two such metropolitan areas in the state of Ohio. Building a house in the city of Columbus is 5% more than the national average. Building a home in Toledo is 7% above the national average.

More Expensive Places To Build in Ohio:

If anything between 10% and 15% is considered more expensive, then there are no such metropolitan areas in state of Ohio.

Very Expensive Places To Build in Ohio

The most expensive places to build a house in the USA are those 15% above the national average. There are no such places in Ohio.

Ohio State Average Costs:

Private home building costs in the state of Ohio are equal to the national average. Building cost rates in the metropolitan areas of Cincinnati, Cleveland and Newark are closer to the Ohio state average by a deviation of 1%. Toledo is the most expensive city to build a home in Ohio, and the state of Ohio is number 11 on the national descending costs scale.

 


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